Recent work

I've worked at big companies like LbiDigitas (then Oyster, Framfab, LBi...) and AKQA, and smaller studios like Storythings and Tonic. I'm comfortable in-house on product teams too.

Working at huge agencies taught me a lot about how to do things quickly and automate the repetitive stuff, but sometimes it's nice to focus deeply on one project.

I've worked on lots of projects over the last fifteen years, but these are the ones I've most enjoyed:

Helix

I worked with Storythings to prototype Helix, a web animation project that tells the story of how culture and science interact, built in Backbone and using JS & CSS animation.

Read more about Helix at Storythings, or view Helix.

Make Some More Noise

An experiment in digital storytelling. The project involved prototyping & workshopping with Storythings to produce a digital version of the play, "The Noise", incorporating interactive reading elements.

I built the prototype in Backbone, with a focus on the mobile & tablet experience - reading devices.

Read more about Make Some More Noise at Storythings, or you can experience The Noise.

FutureLearn

Delivering world-class free online education from universities and cultural institutions worldwide, I helped Futurelearn's product team to design, build and develop features for the platform.

At Futurelearn I learned about the JS testing framework Jasmine, and a bit about Ruby (and Rails). Why not see if you can find a course you'd like to take?

moo.com

The UK's best and most beautiful business stationery product company, built in HTML, CSS, JavaScript (and in their dark ages now, Actionscript).

As well as working in one of several small agile teams, delivering new features across the site, the three things I am most proud of doing in my time at Moo were:

  • leading the redevelopment of the entire front end codebase to use a new custom CMS in ExtJs & CouchDB,
  • helping rebuild the business card designer tool in Actionscript, and
  • co-organising Moo's first hack day.
Other stuff

I started out learning HTML4 (!) at Channel Cyberia - born of Cyberia, the UK's first Internet cafe chain - which is so old it's not even online any more.

Over the years I've done a number of programming courses, in person and online, and I ran my own small web agency during the 2000s.